The last blessing marks the separation of Shabbat from the rest of the week. We say:

,בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, אֱלֹהֵֽינוּ מֶֽלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, הַמַּבְדִיל בֵּין קֹֽדֶשׁ לְחוֹל, בֵּין אוֹר לְחֹֽשֶׁךְ
.בֵּין יִשְׂרָאֵל לָעַמִּים, בֵּין יוֹם הַשְּׁבִיעִי לְשֵֽׁשֶׁת יְמֵי הַמַּעֲשֶׂה
.בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, הַמַּבְדִיל בֵּין קֹֽדֶשׁ לְחוֹל

Baruch atah, Adonai, Elohaynu melech ha'olam, hamavdil bayn kodesh lechol bayn or lechoshech
bayn Yisrael la'amim bayn yom hashevi'i leshayshet yemay hama'aseh.
Baruch atah, Adonai, hamavdil bayn kodesh lechol.

-

Blessed are You, Lord our God, Ruler of the universe, who separates
between holy and secular, between light and darkness, between Israel
and other peoples, between the seventh day and the six days of work.
Blessed are You, Lord our God, who separates between holy and secular.

[A traditional translation.]

-

Blessed are you, The Many-Named, our God, the sovereign of all worlds,
who separates between holy and ordinary, light and dark,
the seventh day and the six days of work.
Blessed are you, The Invisible who separates the holy from the ordinary.

[An alternative translation from Kol Haneshamah, the Reconstructionist siddur.]

We then sip the wine and extinguish the candle in the remaining wine. Many have the custom of singing “Eliyahu Ha’Navi” while slowly lowering the Havdalah candle into the wine so that the candle is extinguished as the song ends.


Type of Custom:

Holiday/Event:

Source: InterfaithFamily